NAME A COUNTRY THAT HAS CHOSEN INDEPENDENCE AND REGRETTED IT

This image has been doing the rounds on social media and has got me thinking about a few things.

Firstly, is this actually true?
Having spent a few hours researching online, the only evidence remotely contrary to this assertion I could find was a 2011 survey in Jamaica that suggested that around 60% of those surveyed thought Jamaica would have been better off had it remained a UK colony.
http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20110628/lead/lead1.html

Secondly, how accurate is the 140?
Again my research has identified 126, rather than 140, but there are a few grey areas. Whatever, it is well over half the roughly 200 countries on the planet today, that have gained independence since 1945.

Thirdly, how many of these have gained independence from the UK?
I make it 48 (or about 38% of the total) and with the possible exception of Jamaica, I can find no evidence of any of them remotely regretting their decision.

Most are much smaller and less wealthy countries than Scotland. And none of them are known as the Brave either!!

There is only one possible conclusion. Scotland will not regret becoming independent.

Voting NO will consign generations of Scots to the regret of what might have been, and the rule of fear over hope.

GO FOR IT SCOTLAND!!

Countires gaining independence since 1945:

Date of independence Alphabetical list of countries UK
?
July 5, 1962 – Algeria
November 11, 1975 – Angola
January 11, 1981 – Antigua and Barbuda UK
Sept. 21, 1991 – Armenia
August 30, 1991 – Azerbaijan
July 10, 1973 – Bahamas UK
August 15, 1971 – Bahrain UK
March 26, 1971 – Bangladesh
November 30, 1966 – Barbados UK
August 25, 1991 – Belarus
Sept. 21, 1981 – Belize UK
August 1, 1960 – Benin
August 8, 1949 – Bhutan
March 3, 1992 – Bosnia and Herzegovina
September 30, 1966 – Botswana UK
January 1, 1984 – Brunei UK
August 5, 1960 – Burkina Faso
January 4, 1948 – Burma UK
July 1, 1962 – Burundi
November 9, 1953 – Cambodia
January 1, 1960 – Cameroon
July 5, 1975 – Cape Verde
August 13, 1960 – Central African Republic
August 11, 1960 – Chad
July 6, 1975 – Comoros
August 15, 1960 – Congo, Dem. Rep. of the
June 30, 1960 – Congo, Republic of the
August 7, 1960 – Cote d’Ivorie
June 25, 1991 – Croatia
August 16, 1960 – Cyprus UK
January 1, 1993 – Czech Republic
June 27, 1977 – Djibouti
November 3, 1978 – Dominica UK
May 20, 2002 – East Timor
October 12, 1968 – Equatorial Guinea
May 24, 1993 – Eritrea
August 20, 1991 – Estonia
October 10, 1970 – Fiji UK
August 17, 1960 – Gabon
February 18, 1965 – Gambia, The UK
April 9, 1991 – Georgia
March 6, 1957 – Ghana UK
February 7, 1974 – Grenada UK
October 2, 1958 – Guinea
Sept. 24, 1973 – Guinea-Bissau
May 26, 1966 – Guyana UK
August 15, 1947 – India
August 17, 1945 – Indonesia
May 14, 1948 – Israel
August 6, 1962 – Jamaica UK
May 25, 1946 – Jordan
December 16, 1991 – Kazakhstan
December 12, 1963 – Kenya UK
July 12, 1979 – Kiribati UK
August 15, 1945 – Korea, North
August 15, 1945 – Korea, South
February 17, 2008 – Kosovo
June 19, 1961 – Kuwait UK
August 21, 1991 – Kyrgyzstan
July 19, 1949 – Laos
Sept. 6, 1991 – Latvia
October 4, 1966 – Lesotho UK
December 24, 1951 – Libya
March 11, 1990 – Lithuania
Sept. 8, 1991 – Macedonia
July 26, 1960 – Madagascar
July 6, 1964 – Malawi UK
August 31, 1957 – Malaysia UK
July 26, 1965 – Maldives UK
Sept. 22, 1960 – Mali
Sept. 21, 1964 – Malta UK
October 21, 1986 – Marshall Islands
November 28, 1960 – Mauritania
March 12, 1968 – Mauritius UK
November 3, 1986 – Micronesia, Federated States of
August 27, 1991 – Moldova
June 3, 2006 – Montenegro
March 2, 1956 – Morocco
June 25, 1975 – Mozambique
March 21, 1990 – Namibia
January 31, 1968 – Nauru
August 3, 1960 – Niger
October 1, 1960 – Nigeria UK
August 14, 1947 – Pakistan UK
October 1, 1994 – Palau
Sept. 16, 1975 – Papua New Guinea
Sept. 3, 1971 – Qatar UK
August 24, 1991 – Russia
July 1, 1962 – Rwanda
February 22, 1979 – Saint Lucia UK
January 1, 1962 – Samoa
July 12, 1975 – Sao Tome and Principe
April 4, 1960 – Senegal
June 5, 2006 – Serbia
June 29, 1976 – Seychelles UK
April 27, 1961 – Sierra Leone UK
August 9, 1965 – Singapore
January 1, 1993 – Slovakia
June 25, 1991 – Slovenia
July 7, 1978 – Solomon Islands UK
July 1, 1960 – Somalia UK
July 9, 2011 – South Sudan
February 4, 1948 – Sri Lanka UK
Sept. 19, 1983 – St Kitts and Nevis UK
October 27, 1979 – St Vincent and the Grenadines UK
January 1, 1956 – Sudan UK
November 25, 1975 – Suriname
Sept. 6, 1968 – Swaziland UK
April 17, 1946 – Syria
Sept. 9, 1991 – Tajikistan
April 26, 1964 – Tanzania UK
May 27, 1960 – Togo
June 4, 1970 – Tonga UK
August 31, 1962 – Trinidad and Tobago UK
March 20, 1956 – Tunisia
October 27, 1991 – Turkmenistan
October 1, 1978 – Tuvalu UK
October 9, 1962 – Uganda UK
November 24, 1991 – Ukraine
November 2, 1971 – United Arab Emirates UK
Sept. 1, 1991 – Uzbekistan
July 30, 1980 – Vanuatu UK
Sept. 2, 1945 – Vietnam
May 22, 1990 – Yemen UK
October 24, 1964 – Zambia UK
April 18, 1980 – Zimbabwe UK
March 24, 2016 ?? SCOTLAND ?? UK

4 thoughts on “NAME A COUNTRY THAT HAS CHOSEN INDEPENDENCE AND REGRETTED IT

  1. LP

    You might want to do some more research. Many of the countries listed either collapsed into civil war or economically crumbled quite quickly after gaining their independence with catastrophic results for the population.

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  2. Mark Anthony

    There are plenty in that list that where independence really didn’t work out.

    After Algeria went independent, the political system was rapidly Islamised and radical Islam was allowed to spread. The country collapsed economically within 20 years, and within 30 civil war broke out between FIS (Islamic state supporting groups.

    Angola went independent from Portugal in 1975 and immediately collapsed into civil war, fighting for nearly 27 years and killing millions until reaching a ceasefire in 2002. Life expectancy in Angola has fallen to 39.

    Armenia and Azeraijan’s secession from the Soviet Union resulted in a crippled economy for both states, and a civil war that lasted for three years and the situation with the breakaway state of Nagorno-Karabakh remains very contentious to this day. Both states are recovering, though the Nagorno-Karabakh region isn’t seeing any benefit.

    Bahrain is prosperous, though politically unstable and frequent uprisings have led to a number of civilian deaths since independence.

    Bangladesh’s peaceful independence in 1975 only lasted a decade after the president was assassinated and the government replaced by the military. Bangladesh has since reverted to being a democracy but suffers greatly from high levels of political corruption and an impoverished population.

    Belarus is one of the least economically and politically free countries in the world and still seems to think it’s behind some sort of iron curtain. It’s generally considered the most repressed European state by a significant margin.

    Benin gained independence from France in 1960 and underwent 12 years of violence and non-stop regime changes. The Marxist-Leninist government nationalised the banking system in 1972, and the country had bankrupted itself and many people had left the country by 1979.

    I could go on – but the majority of the countries in this list haven’t exactly benefited from independence. The results for many have actually been quite catastrophic.

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  3. Rangjan

    The issue here is that you are generally comparing apples to pears: almost anything is preferable to being ruled by a colonial country and colonialism is an international crime.
    For all the problems with the Union, Scotland was not a colony. So you would need to look at countries like the former Czechoslovakia or Yugoslavia and the separations they experienced. Here you have other problems because these countries were Eastern European dictatorships prior to this so the comparisons are different.
    In short, I don’t think this is an argument but an appeal to emotion.

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  4. Bridgend or Swansea Green Party - South Wales West Post author

    Some perfectly valid points raised above. There are are fair few countries listed that have seen a lot of turmoil since gaining independence. In Africa, in particular, this was in often due to crass artificial borders imposed by colonial powers that bivided natural nations into artificial countries.

    But references to political corruption and impoverished people are increasingly true of the UK. A driving force for independence in Scotland is a vison of a better future.

    And for all the turmoil in some other countries, none are offering themselves up to be re-colonised. Self-determination is a ‘for better or worse’ proposition, just like marriage. Does the divorce rate mean people should not get married? Does a potential struggle mean you should not strike out on your own?

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